Episode 2.3 – Revisiting “Don’t Act Like a Grad Student”

July 28, 2020
Episode 2.3 – Revisiting “Don’t Act Like a Grad Student”
The Professor Is In
Episode 2.3 – Revisiting “Don’t Act Like a Grad Student”
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Show Notes

When Karen gave the advice, “stop acting like a grad student,” she was working from a model grad student in her mind who, it turns out when she gave it a bit more thought, was a white male. In today’s episode, Karen and Kel dig into that normative model, and talk about all the ways that the advice on how a job seeker “needs to act” needs to be complicated to account for people who come from different subject positions and are viewed through different racist lenses. Advice about “thinking your department is out to get you” for example, needs to reflect that for many grad students of color, the department really is out to get you.

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